Life in Kampala

Prior to my trip to Uganda, I had a lot of questions on my mind….. I wondered what the country looked like, the nature of the people, their culture, food, e.t.c. Landing at Entebbe airport in the Wakiso district, Central part of Uganda, I was very captivated when I saw “Welcome to Uganda, the pearl of Africa”, my face lit up and  I was so excited that I wanted to talk to anyone that would tell me about Uganda. Immediately, I met a lady from Venezuela who was visiting Uganda for the first time as a tourist to see Lake Victoria. This further spurred my excitement to know more about the country.

About an hour drive from Entebbe is Kampala, the largest and the most industrialized city in Uganda. Life in Kampala is very busy as I saw a large multitude of people hustling and bustling, going about their daily activities on a hot sunny day. Communicating with the people was not a problem, because most people speak English. Even though Kampala is the capital of Uganda, it is still mostly dominated by one tribal group, the Bagandans and the most popular language spoken by this tribe is Luganda, however there are over 54 languages spoken throughout Uganda. Swahili is another language spoken in Kampala, although not as popular as Luganda, it’s still occasionally used for business transaction.

.Ugandan flag and I

Despite the dominancy of the local language, Kampala entertains all tribes. The most common staple food is plantain locally known as Matoki. Their traditional outfit was originally “bark cloth” made  from the bark of the trees which is gradually being phased out and nowadays the women wear Gomasy and the men wear Kanzu for traditional occasions. Their melodious local music is known as Kadongokamu. Geographically Kampala is also known to have seven hills. While I was in Kampala for six days, I had an amazing opportunity to visit the art and craft stores to learn more about the Ugandan art. It was really great to be in Kampala as I enjoyed learning about the culture and I found the people interesting, receptive and really friendly.

And off I am to Northern Uganda, where I will be spending the rest of my two months conducting the research. The experience has just begun, I’m so excited to not only learn about this region but also experience and be a part of it! I can’t wait to share with you my time in Northern Uganda…. Please stay tuned!!!!

Below are pictures taken at the arts and crafts store in Kampala with Ms Esther , one of the store owners.

life in Kampala

life in Kampala

neck beads made from paper

neck beads made from paper

Ms. Esther with Ugandan flag.

Ms. Esther with Uganda flag.

Paper bowl made from paper

Paper bowl made from paper

Handbag made from white sac

Handbag made from white sac

Greetings from Uganda

Greetings from Uganda

Dining coaster holder front view made from cow horn

Dining coaster holder front view made from cow’s horn

Musical instrument -  Djembe drums

Musical instrument – Djembe drums

coffee holder made from spear grass

coffee holder made from spear grass

coaster holder

Dining coaster holder side view made from cow’s horn

coaster holder front view

Dining coaster holder front view made from cow’s horn

 

neck beads made from cow horn

neck beads made from cow’s horn

Clock made from rose wood

Clock made from rose wood

Ladies wallet made from coconut

Ladies wallet made from coconut

Jewelry made from cow horn and wood.

Jewelry made from cow’s horn and wood.

Table mat made from paper

Table mat made from paper

photo album made from bark cloth

photo album made from bark cloth

Ugandan flag and I

Uganda flag and I

Purse made from paper

Purse made from paper

One Comment

  1. Typically African: raw intelligence, abundant skills, bunch of resilient people and always hoping tomorrow will be better.
    Abundant natural resources, but enjoyed by a few! Illiteracy, diseases and stark ignorance pervading the landscape.everywhere you go. Who will deliver this land?

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